24/05/2024

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Living the high life? Estate agents face online mockery after advertising a £200,000 five-bed family home – with pictures from when it was a cannabis farm

Living the high life? Estate agents face online mockery after advertising a £200,000 five-bed family home – with pictures from when it was a cannabis farm

Estate agents have faced online mockery after advertising a family home for sale using pictures from when it was a cannabis farm.

House hunters in Derby were gobsmacked to find the listing of the five-bed family home included photos of large plants, pots, fans and the remains of other industrial-sized indoor growing paraphernalia throughout the property.

The Derbyshire property was listed for sale on Rightmove by estate agents Bagshaws Residential for a ‘bargain’ auction guide price of £150,000 to £200,000 on 6th July.

However the listing went viral when people spotted the shocking images.

It turns out that the home was a cannabis farm back in 2019, with police snaps showing it housed more than 500 plants across the 12-room dwelling.

The photos showed reflective silver material peeling off the walls, accompanied by what appears to be large carbon filters among many entangled wires.

Living the high life? Estate agents face online mockery after advertising a £200,000 five-bed family home – with pictures from when it was a cannabis farm

It turns out that the home was a cannabis farm back in 2019, with police snaps (pictured) showing it housed more than 500 plants across the 12-room dwelling

The ‘indoor gardening’ equipment can be seen within several rooms, with standing fans littered across the attic floor and more than 16 substantially-sized plant pots filled with soil stacked up in the kitchen

The ‘indoor gardening’ equipment can be seen within several rooms, with standing fans littered across the attic floor and more than 16 substantially-sized plant pots filled with soil stacked up in the kitchen

The Derby property is currently sold and under offer, while another local commenter claiming online that it sold for £210,000 at auction on August 1st

Panicked estate agents quickly hid the ‘incriminating’ images.

The ‘indoor gardening’ equipment can be seen within several rooms, with standing fans littered across the attic floor and more than 16 substantially-sized plant pots filled with soil stacked up in the kitchen.

There are little signs that it was a liveable space other than a small toilet, several discarded mugs and a clothes hanger in the kitchen.

Estate agents Bagshaws Residential’s listing described the three-storey home as in need of ‘a full scheme of renovations’.

The listing also warned that ‘currently no internal viewings are available’.

Meanwhile, stunned viewers online took to social media share their bewilderment as to why the estate agents would use photos that showed its previous history so plainly.

The Derby property is currently sold and under offer, while another local commenter claiming online that it sold for £210,000 at auction on August 1st.

Sequence Auctions, part of the Sequence group along with Bagshaws Residential, explained it was ‘vital that selling agents ensure the state of repair of the property is transparently shown so buyers can make informed decisions’.

Pictured: The Rightmove listing advertising the property

Pictured: The Rightmove listing advertising the property

Someone joked: 'Some serious indoor gardening going on there,' with another adding 'a bargain is a bargain in this economy'

Someone joked: ‘Some serious indoor gardening going on there,’ with another adding ‘a bargain is a bargain in this economy’

However they did not clarify why the images appeared to afterwards be removed.

One person online commented: ‘Can’t believe the estate agents have uploaded these photos’.

Another said: ‘I’m literally two mins away from that house and I’m baffled how it was used for what it was being next to a primary school.’

A third joked: ‘Some serious indoor gardening going on there,’ with another adding ‘a bargain is a bargain in this economy.’

Someone else added: ‘It sold for £210k via auction, that surprised me. Thought it’d be more. No doubt it’ll be flipped and back on the market for £800k in a year though.’

The Facebook page for Derbyshire Constabulary’s Safer Neighbourhood Policing Team for Normanton and Rose Hill posted about the repossession of the home back in May 2019, writing: ‘Well as the late great Freddie Mercury once sang.. ANOTHER ONE BITES THE DUST.

‘Officers from Normanton SNT have located yet another Cannabis Grow with in excess of 500 plants in the Normanton area.. (plant emoji)… Currently gathering evidence and continuing with enquiries to identify the offenders..

‘We’ll keep you posted. £upinsmoke.’

The Facebook page for Derbyshire Constabulary’s Safer Neighbourhood Policing Team for Normanton and Rose Hill posted about the repossession of the home back in May 2019

The Facebook page for Derbyshire Constabulary’s Safer Neighbourhood Policing Team for Normanton and Rose Hill posted about the repossession of the home back in May 2019

Derbyshire Police confirmed that a cannabis grow was found at the property in May 2019, but that no arrests have been made in relation to the investigation

Derbyshire Police confirmed that a cannabis grow was found at the property in May 2019, but that no arrests have been made in relation to the investigation

Derbyshire Police confirmed that a cannabis grow was found at the property in May 2019, but that no arrests have been made in relation to the investigation.

Bagshaws Residential said it was a matter for Barnard Marcus Auction House to respond on – both are part of the Sequence group.

Chris Glenn, divisional managing director for Sequence Auctions, said: ‘Landlords that have had a difficult experience managing a property may have gone through months or even years trying to reclaim them and will quite often enter them into an auction for an efficient sale.

‘However, following the pandemic the auction process has somewhat changed and many auctions are not back in the room.

‘They have remained largely digital with many investors buying properties online without seeing them.

‘This makes it vital that selling agents ensure the state of repair of the property is transparently shown so buyers can make informed decisions.

‘This is especially true in auctions as the sale is a legally binding exchange, often on the day, compared with a private treaty sale which will take a number of months.’

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk